Dog Breed Info

Placing The Right Procedure In The Right Phase

Placing the right procedure in the right phase is important to prevent having to replicate the task or not achieve the maximum results because the task was completed during the wrong phase.

Procedure: Removing Long Hair Around the Eye Area
Prep Phase
The excess coat around the eye area should be removed with clippers or thinners during the prep to prevent the hair from touching the eyes during the bathing procedure. Many breeds such as the Yorkshire Terrier and Shih Tzu have long hair that grows toward the corner of the eye, especially if the hair has been trimmed previously. During the bathing procedure, shampoo collects on the longer hairs that can brush against the eyes causing irritation or serious damage to the eye. After the long hairs are clean and dry, they tend to stick out even more, creating a danger to the eye area.


Removing Tearing That has Formed a Crusted Mass Around the Eye Area
Prep Phase
Many pets have excessive tearing. If left over a period of time, the tearing dries, forming a crusted mass that sticks to the hair and skin and is very difficult to remove. If possible, use a clipper with a #10 blade to go under the mass and shave the hair removing the crusted mass along with the hair. If the clipper will not go under the mass, it must be soaked and removed in the bathing phase.


Bath Phase
If the tearing has created a crusted mass that is dry and sticking to the hair and skin around the eye area, a warm wet cloth should be used during the bath phase to soak and soften the crusted mass.


Finish Phase
If the skin around the eye area is irritated due to the drainage, use an eye ointment after trimming the area during the finish phase.


Pets With Special Needs - Exception to the Rule Dogs
Dogs that have continuous eye drainage become very head shy because of the skin irritation, therefore the cleaning of the eye area can be accomplished during any phase. Dogs with severe eye drainage should come in often to have the eye area cleaned and the hair trimmed between regular groomings.


Removing the Hair from the Dog's Ear Canal
Prep Phase
The hair in the ear canal should be removed during the prep to allow for a thorough cleansing with liquid ear cleaner during the bath phase. It is also easier to remove ear hair growth using an ear powder. This ear powder should be wiped out of the ear during the bath. If left, the ear powder could cause skin irritation.


Exception to the Rule Dog
If the ear hair has to be removed after the prep, the powder can be wiped out with a liquid ear cleaner and cotton balls during any phase.


Trimmings and Filing the Dog's Nails
Prep Phase
The nails are trimmed or filed during the prep. If the nail is quicked, a coagulant is used to stop the nail from bleeding . This coagulant can leave a stain on the coat that can be cleaned during the bath.


Pets With Special Needs - Exception to the Rule Dogs
Trimming the nails on a very large dog can be difficult because of the hardness of the nails. A bath softens the nails, therefore, making it easier to trim the nails after the bath on very large breeds. If the nails have to be trimmed after the bath and the nail is quicked, a waterless shampoo product or hydrogen peroxide can be used to clean the area to remove the stain from the coagulant.


Clippering the Sanitary Area
Prep Phase
The hair on the stomach and rectal area is often the most soiled, especially on long haired dogs. It is easier and more efficient to bathe and dry the pet without the excess hair on the stomach and rectal area. Dogs that are not groomed on a regular schedule may also be more sensitive to the clippering of the stomach area. If irritation occurs, a medicated shampoo can be used during the bath to soothe the skin. Typically, the sanitary clippering will have to be repeated during the finish because it is not possible to achieve a smooth clippered finish when the skin and coat are dirty.

Many short-haired breeds will not require, or should not have, a sanitary clip. The coat on some of the short hair breeds is very stiff and when this coat is clipped, the short clipped hair immediately feels like little pins on the stomach and rectal area. Each time the dog moves his legs or tail, the short stiff hair sticks the stomach and under the tail area. The dog will react immediately by licking and chewing the area. Often he/she will walk and suddenly sit, biting at the area and often begins to scoot. The scooting can cause a rug type burn on the irritated areas.

Finish Phase
For dogs that are on a regular grooming schedule, the clippering of the sanitary areas has to be done only one time, which should be during the finish phase.


Clippering the Hair Between the Pads
Prep Phase
The excess hair between the pads on dogs that are not groomed on a regular schedule, should be clipped to allow for a thorough cleaning of the foot and ease of drying. If the skin between the pads is irritated due to matting, a medicated shampoo can be used during the bath.

Finish Phase
On a dog that is groomed on a regular schedule, the hair between the pads is clipped during the finish phase. The hair growth is minimum and it is easier to clip clean and fluff dried hair as opposed to clipping dirty hair that sticks to the pad.
  • The clippering of the pads on dogs with muddy or wet feet can be done after the bath in the finish phase. Clippering dirty, wet hair dulls the clipper blades.
  • Certain types of breeds, such as the short haired or smooth coated breeds, do not require clippering the hair between the pads.

Removing Undercoat from Double Coated Breeds
Prep
Double coated breeds that have such thick undercoat that you are not able to part the coat and see the skin of the dog can be brushed during the prep with the proper tools to help break the undercoat up. The removal of undercoat continues in all phases for this type of coat.

Bath Phase
Coat conditioners can be applied during the bath to assist in removing the undercoat.

Drying Phase
The high velocity dryer is used to blow the packed undercoat out away from the skin.

Brushing Phase
Brushing products and tools are used during the brushing phase to remove all undercoat.

Finish Phase
A finishing spray can be used along with a brush and comb to final check and remove all undercoat.


Removing Dead Coat By Handstripping
Prep Phase
The procedure of removing dead coat by handstripping should begin during the prep using a brush, a stripping knife and/or a carding tool. Chalk is also applied during the prep phase to assist in removing the coat.

Drying Phase
The procedure continues during the drying phase utilizing dryers, brushes and combs to remove the dead coat.

Brushing Phase
The procedure continues in the brushing phase. The same type tools used in the prep phase are also used in the brushing phase to remove the dead coat.

Finish Phase
The procedure continues in the finish phase which at this point the grooming is almost complete. The same tools used in the prep, drying and brushing phase are used in the finish phase.


Removing Dead Coat by Carding
Prep Phase
The procedure of removing undercoat by carding is started in the prepping phase.

Brushing Phase
The procedure continues in the brushing phase. The same type tools used in the prep phase are also used in the brushing phase to remove the dead coat.

Finish Phase
The procedure of removing undercoat continues in the finish phase which at this point the grooming is almost complete. The same tools used in the prep, drying and brushing phase are used in the finish phase.


Removing Matts
Prep Phase
Hard, tight matts that are in areas behind the ears, pads, stomach and under the tail should be removed with a clipper (never a scissors) during the prep phase. These areas will not affect the finished trim. Dogs that are not groomed on a regular schedule, with solid body and leg matting, should be clipped down completely during the prep phase, so that the skin can be shampooed and treated. Compassion for the dog is the number one concern when removing matts. Excessive brushing can cause skin irritation and discomfort and can cause the pet to react in a very negative manner. The area of the matt, type of coat, and type of matting must be evaluated to determine during what phase the matting should be removed.


Bath Phase
Coat conditioners can be applied during the bathing phase to assist in brushing out the coat.Conditioners also help keep certain coat types healthier.


Drying Phase
Matts that are close to the skin in areas that will affect the profile can be force-dried. Using this method will lift the matt away from the skin allowing for a longer blade to be used.


Brushing Phase
All tangles and mats should be removed during the brushing phase. All matts must be removed before the finish phase can be started. Special products are available to assist in removing matts.


Finish Phase
Small matts and tangles that were not able to be brushed out can be clipped out during the finish phase.


Thinning the Coat
Prep Phase
Two types of thinning techniques can be used during the prep phase. One technique is to remove excessive coat not needed during the finish phase to create the proper profile. The other technique is used to decrease the amount of coat.


Finish Phase
Coats that must be thinned or areas that must be blended should be completed in the finish phase.


Clippering Excess Hair from the Head, Body and Legs
Prep Phase
If the type of trim requires clipping the head, neck, body and legs, then excessive hair should be removed before the bath. The same procedures will have to be repeated during the finish phase.


Finish Phase
All areas that were clippered during the prep phase will need to be clippered again during the finish phase in order to achieve a smooth clippered finish.


Clippering the Poodle Face, Feet and Tail
Prep Phase
The excess coat on the face, feet and tail of a Poodle should be removed during the prep. Removing the excess coat not only allows for a thorough bathing, it will lesson the drying time. Excessive head, body and leg coat can be removed as well. It is not necessary to detail-clip these areas until after the bath. With the proper bathing and drying procedures, the face, feet and tail are easy to shave because the hair is clean and fluff-dried.


Poodles that are groomed on a frequent schedule (6 weeks or less) will not require the face, feet, tail, body and leg coat to be clipped before the bath. All clippering can be accomplished during the finish phase.

Finish Phase
Dogs that have had the face, feet and tail clipped in the prep phase must have all clippering repeated in the finish phase. Poodles that are groomed on a frequent schedule (6 weeks or less) can have all clippering started and completed in this phase.


Styling
Prep Phase
The coat that is needed to create the trim style is prepared during the prepping phase.


Finish Phase
All styling is completed in the finishing phase. The final clippering, scissoring, handstripping, carding and thinning is completed.
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