Dog Breed Info

Bathing

Bathing is an essential part of every dog’s maintenance and regularly scheduled baths help keep a dog feeling and looking great along with smelling fresh and clean. Whether or not the bath is a pleasant experience for the dog depends on both the skill of the professional and the environment within which the procedure is performed. An appropriate bathing schedule should be established for each individual dog so that specific needs are addressed for each pet in reference to the skin, coat, and type of trim. Bathing schedules also depend upon the lifestyle of the pet. A dog that lives inside demands more frequent baths than a dog that runs on a farm every day.The coat type and the condition of the skin and coat dictates which products, tools and techniques to utilize on man's best friend. The bathing procedure, along with the other ‘prep’ procedures, forms the foundation for the ultimate finish. Without this foundation the professional will be forced into a great deal of additional work to achieve the proper finish. Many seasoned professionals will tell you that the bathing phase of the grooming and styling is the most important phase because without a squeaky clean coat, you are not able to accomplish not only the ultimate profile but you will not be able to create an overall neat and tidy appearance.

Why
Bathing the dog keeps the skin and coat in excellent condition.

When
A dog can be bathed as often as once a week if the right products and techniques are used to enhance the condition of the skin and coat.

Where
The dog is placed in the bathing station and secured before the shampooing process begins.

How
The shampoo is applied to the coat and worked in a massage type fashion to not only clean the coat but to stimulate the skin.

Products
The professional must first determine the correct coat type in order to choose the correct bathing technique. The skin and condition of the coat must also be evaluated prior to choosing a shampoo and conditioner to prevent over treatment with moisturizers and conditioners that can eventually cause skin problems, create dull and heavy coat and actually assist in matting the coat. The skin must be checked for any signs of parasites such as fleas and/or ticks to determine if a special shampoo and bathing procedure utilized for treating dogs with parasites is necessary. You should not only be patient and compassionate, incorporating gentle handling and safety practices, but also persistent in the pursuit of cleanliness. When the bathing procedure is accomplished in a professional manner, the pet should leave this phase of the grooming and styling squeaky clean and very relaxed.

Tools
The rubber brush is an excellent tool to use during the bathing procedure on coat type that require the rub bathing technique.

Rubber Brush

Be Prepared for the Pet's Reaction
After placing the pet in the bathing station and securing the pet with the safety loop, always have a gentle but secure hold on the head before turning the water on to be prepared for the pet's reaction.

Procedures Performed with the Bath
There are specific procedures that must be performed during the grooming and styling session such as brushing the dog's teeth and cleaning the ears. In many salons, these tasks are performed in various places making for a very disorganized and inefficient situation. In order to create excellent time management, we have placed specific procedures in the bathing phase simply because it is much easier and more efficient and requires less clean up if performed in this area, such as cleaning the ears using cotton balls and a ear cleaning solution. You will be shocked at what comes out of the ears on the cotton balls after working in a salon for several months and you see the need to disinfect your hemostats and wash your hands constantly in order to maintain excellent sanitation, making it almost impossible at the grooming and styling station because most do not have running water. Performing these tasks in one specific area in the salon allows you to collect all of the necessary products and tools and have them readily available for excellent time management, and creates a much safer environment with all tools and products within arms reach. The grooming procedures that coincide with the bathing procedure are listed below:

  • Evaluating the Gums & Teeth for Toothbrushing (prior to applying water)
  • Tooth Brushing (prior to applying water)
  • Gel Breath Freshener (prior to applying water)
  • Ear Cleaning (prior to applying water)
  • Expressing Anal Glands (during the application of water to the rear of the dog)

Removing Eye Drainage During the Bath
When removing eye drainage that has dried leaving a crusted mass at the corner of the eyes, gently apply warm water around the corner of the eyes to soften the mass. Turn the water down low and allow the water to run over the area until the mass is softened. If the dog will not allow you to run the water over the area, especially dogs with pushed in faces, use a soft cloth to hold over the area. You may have to wet or soak the cloth often to dissolve the mass using this method. After it is softened, use a flea comb to gently comb with the lay of coat to remove the drainage from the hair. Check the area afterwards for skin irritation and if there is any, treat with a medicated ointment during the finishing phase.

Basic Bathing Steps for all Coat Types
Always shampoo the body first and let the shampoo set on the coat and then go to the head and begin all necessary tasks such as caring for the eyes, ears, gums and teeth before the head is shampooed. If you think the task of taking care of the eyes, ears, teeth and gums will take longer than the time limit that you have allowed for the shampoo to set on the body, take care of the tasks on the head first but do not shampoo the head. After the head tasks are completed, go to the body and shampoo and then go back and shampoo the head. This system allows for the shampoo to set on the body coat to do its job and also allows you to secure the head for the shampooing and to continue to secure the head during the rinsing to prevent the dog from shaking and throwing shampoo and water all over you and the bathing station. Remember, dogs shake from their head to their tail so to keep from getting soaked, keep a gentle and secure hold on the head after it is wet. There are basically three different techniques or methods used to bathe, rinse and condition the various coat types on man's best friend.

PROCEDURE ONE
The rub bathing, rinsing and conditioning method is used on the hairless, short, smooth and Nordic coat types and should not be used on the other coat types that have longer coat because this method will actually twist and tangle the longer coats. This method should not be used on the wire and sporting coat types because it will lift the coat on the jacket area rather than keep the coat lying smooth following the contour of the dog's body. Use your hands or a rubber brush to work the shampoo into the coat using a back and forth motion to not only clean the skin and coat but to also assist in removing shedding coat.

Rub Bathing

  • Apply the water with and against the lay of coat.
  • Apply the shampoo down to the skin with and against the lay of coat.
  • Work the shampoo with and against the lay of coat using your hands or a rubber brush depending upon the length of the coat.
  • Rub the coat vigorously with and against the lay of coat, using your hands or a rubber brush to remove as much loose coat as possible during the shampoo.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary to get the coat clean.

Rub Rinsing
  • Apply the water with and against the lay of coat.
  • Work the water with and against the lay of coat using your hands or a rubber brush.
  • Rub the coat vigorously with and against the lay of coat, using your hands or a rubber brush to remove as much loose coat as possible during the rinse.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary to get the coat rinsed of shampoo.

Rub Conditioner
  • Apply the water with and against the lay of coat.
  • Apply the conditioner with and against the lay of coat.
  • Work the conditioner with and against the lay of coat using your hands or a rubber brush.
  • Rub the coat vigorously with and against the lay of coat, using your hands or a rubber brush to remove as much loose coat as possible during the conditioning.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary get the coat conditioned.

PROCEDURE TWO
The massage bathing, rinsing and conditioning method is used on the tight and loose curly, the broken, scruffy and tight wire, the medium smooth and medium long, the sporting and sporting saddle, the rough and Nordic rough coat types. This bathing method is designed to work with the lay of the coat at all times to prevent "lifting" the coat on the jacket area. Working with the lay of coat also prevents tangling the longer coat. Use your hands or a rubber brush to work the shampoo into the coat being careful not to rub the coat back and forth.

Massage Bathing

  • Apply the water with the lay of the coat.
  • Apply the shampoo with the lay of the coat.
  • Work the shampoo into the coat down to the skin with the lay of coat using your hands.
  • Massage the skin and coat using your hands and following the lay of the coat.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary get the skin and coat clean.

Massage Rinsing
  • Apply the water with the lay of coat.
  • Work the water with the lay of coat using your hands.
  • Massage the coat with the lay of coat, using your hands to rinse the coat thoroughly.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary get the coat rinsed of shampoo.

Massage Conditioner
  • Apply the water with the lay of coat.
  • Apply the conditioner with the lay of coat.
  • Work the conditioner with the lay of coat using your hands.
  • Massage the coat with the lay of coat using your hands to condition the coat thoroughly.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary get the coat conditioned.

PROCEDURE THREE
The soak bathing method is a special technique used on the tight and loose curly coat types that have been allowed to cord. The dog is immersed in a tub full of a water and shampoo mixture and allowed to soak. The tub is filled again with just water to rinse the coat and on the last rinse a vinegar solution or a product stabilizer is used.

Soak bathing

  • Fill the bathing tub with water and shampoo mixture until it reaches at least the base of the neck area of the dog.
  • Soak the pet in the water and shampoo mixture.
  • Drain the water and shampoo mixture.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary get the coat clean.

Soak Rinsing
  • Fill the bathing tub with water until it reaches the neck area of the dog.
  • Soak the pet in the water.
  • Drain the water.
  • Fill the bathing tub with water and vinegar solution or a product stabilizer.
  • Follow the same procedure as many times as necessary to get the coat rinsed of shampoo.

Soak Conditioning
  • Fill the bathing tub with a water and conditioner mixture until it reaches at least the base of the neck area of the dog.
  • Soak the pet in the water and conditioning mixture.
  • Drain the water.
  • Following the conditioner procedures as many time as necessary to get the coat conditioned.

PROCEDURE FOUR
Bathing Procedure when the Water and Shampoo are Applied Separately
  • Step 1 Apply water to thoroughly wet the coat.
  • Step 2 Apply shampoo to clean the coat.
  • Step 3 Apply water to rinse the coat.
  • Step 4 Apply conditioner to the coat.
  • Step 5 Apply water to rinse the coat.
  • Review the pet ticket.
  • Evaluate the skin and coat condition.
  • Determine the correct shampoo and conditioner.

Safely Secure the Pet
  • Place the pet in the tub with the head away from drain.
  • Hook the safety loop to the eye hook in the tub.
  • Adjust the safety loop to the correct position on the dog.

Before the Bath Procedures
  • Evaluate the gums and teeth for tooth brushing.
  • Brush the dog's teeth.
  • Apply the gum and teeth treatment along with breath freshener.
  • Clean the underside of the ear leather and the ear canal.

Bath Time
  • Use one hand to hold the pet securely before turning the water on. Place your hand under the jaw area where the safety loop rest.
  • Turn the water on pointing the nozzle toward the drain and test the water temperature on your wrist.
  • Apply the water beginning at the rear, saturate the coat thoroughly, make sure to get under the tail, and work your way to the neck area.
  • Return to the rear and check the anal glands and express if necessary. Rinse this area immediately and thoroughly.

First Shampoo: Tail to Head Procedure
  • Begin by applying the shampoo mixture on the rear and work towards the neck area.
  • Work the lather into the coat using the proper shampoo method for the coat type.
  • Go to the head area and apply the shampoo.
  • Secure the head with one hand so that the dog does not shake throwing shampoo everywhere.
  • Work the shampoo into the coat utilizing the correct method until it has been on the coat long enough to do its job.

First Rinse: Head to Tail Procedure
  • Lower the water pressure and rinse the head holding it in an upward position to prevent water from entering into the eyes, ears, nose and mouth.
  • Continue down the neck area rinsing the coat thoroughly.
  • Go to the body area and work the skin and coat utilizing the correct method as you rinse the body.

Second Shampoo: Tail to Head Procedure
  • Repeat the "first shampoo" procedure, again beginning at the rear of the dog and working up to the head.

Second Rinse: Head to Tail Procedure
  • Repeat the "first rinse procedures" beginning with the head, working toward the tail.

Conditioner/Moisturizer: Tail to Head Procedure
  • Apply the conditioner/moisturizer beginning at the rear working up to the neck area.
  • Use one hand to secure the head by placing your hand under the jaw area where the safety loop rests.
  • Apply the conditioner to the head.
  • Work the skin and coat until the conditioner has been on the coat long enough to do its job.

Final Rinse: Head to Tail Procedure
  • Repeat the "first rinse procedures" beginning with the head working toward the tail.
  • Be sure to completely rinse all products from the hair. Residue leftover from shampoos and conditioners can cause skin problems.

Praise the dog after completing the bathing procedures for allowing you to complete this task!

PROCEDURE FIVE
Bathing Procedure With A Shampoo System that Applies the Water and Shampoo Together

  • Step 1 Apply water and shampoo to the coat.
  • Step 2 Apply water to rinse the coat.
  • Step 3 Apply conditioner to the coat.
  • Step 4 Apply water to rinse the coat.
  • Review the pet ticket.
  • Evaluate the skin and coat condition.
  • Determine the correct shampoo and conditioner.

Safely Secure the Pet
  • Place the pet in the tub with the head away from drain.
  • Hook the safety loop to the eye hook in the tub.
  • Adjust the safety loop to the correct position on the dog.

Before the Bath Procedures
  • Evaluate the gums and teeth for tooth brushing.
  • Brush the dog's teeth.
  • Apply the gum and teeth treatment along with breath freshener.
  • Clean the underside of the ear leather and the ear canal.

Bath Time
  • Use one hand to hold the pet securely before turning the water on. Place your hand under the jaw area where the safety loop rests.
  • Turn the water on pointing the nozzle toward the drain and test the water temperature on your wrist.

First Shampoo: Tail to Head Procedure
  • Apply the water and shampoo beginning at the rear, saturate the coat thoroughly, make sure to get under the tail, and work your way to the neck area.
  • Return to the rear and check the anal glands and express if necessary. Rinse this area immediately and thoroughly.
  • Work the lather into the coat using the proper shampoo method for the coat type.
  • Go to the head area and apply the shampoo.
  • Secure the head with one hand so that the dog does not shake throwing shampoo everywhere.
  • Work the shampoo into the coat utilizing the correct method until it has been on the coat long enough to do its job.

First Rinse: Head to Tail Procedure
  • Lower the water pressure and rinse the head holding it in an upward position to prevent water from entering into the eyes, ears, nose and mouth.
  • Continue down the neck area rinsing the coat thoroughly.
  • Go to the body area and work the skin and coat utilizing the correct method as you rinse the body.

Second Shampoo: Tail to Head Procedure
  • Repeat the "first shampoo" procedure, again beginning at the rear of the dog and working up to the head.

Second Rinse: Head to Tail Procedure
  • Repeat the "first rinse procedures" beginning with the head working toward the tail.

Conditioner/Moisturizer: Tail to Head Procedure
  • Apply the conditioner/moisturizer beginning at the rear working up to the neck area.
  • Use one hand to secure the head by placing your hand under the jaw area where the safety loop rest.
  • Apply the conditioner to the head.
  • Work the skin and coat until the conditioner has been on the coat long enough to do its job.

Final Rinse: Head to Tail Procedure
  • Repeat the "first rinse procedures" beginning with the head working toward the tail.
  • Be sure to completely rinse all products from the hair. Residue leftover from shampoos and conditioners can cause skin problems.

Praise the dog after completing the bathing procedures for allowing you to complete this task!

PROCEDURE SIX
Bathing a Dog with Fleas

Bathing dogs with fleas is a matter of strategy. The professional must be able to cover the dog's head as quickly as possible with the flea shampoo to prevent the fleas from running in the eyes, ears, nose and mouth of the dog. The next step is to quickly go to the other end and shampoo around the tail area. Now that you have both ends taken care of so that the fleas are at your mercy, begin at the neck area and work your way back to the tail. Allow for the shampoo to stay on the dog as long as indicated by the manufacturer. Make sure that you secure the dog's head at all times so that the dog doesn't shake and fling flea shampoo. To apply the flea shampoo to the head area, utilize a small applicator so that you can focus on intricate areas such as under and over the eye area.

PROCEDURE SEVEN
Removing Eye Drainage During the Bath

When removing eye drainage that has dried leaving a crusted mass at the corner of the eyes, gently apply warm water around the corner of the eyes to soften the mass. Turn the water down low and allow the water to run over the area until the mass is softened. If the dog will not allow you to run the water over the area, especially dogs with pushed in faces, use a soft cloth to hold over the area. You may have to wet or soak the cloth often to dissolve the mass using this method. After it is softened, use a flea comb to gently comb with the lay of coat to remove the drainage from the hair. Check the area afterwards for skin irritation and if there is any, treat with a medicated ointment during the finishing phase.

PROCEDURE EIGHT
Common Mistakes Made During the Bathing Phase

  • A typical mistake made by many bathers is not wetting the coat enough before applying shampoo. Shampoo is designed to be applied to a very wet coat; in fact, applying shampoo to a dry or partially dry coat can actually damage it. Hold the nozzle as close as possible to the skin so that the water penetrates the coat and helps to exfoliate the skin. Take the time to saturate the coat running the water over and over until it is dripping wet before applying shampoo.
  • Another common mistake is not using enough shampoo and not working the shampoo into the coat down to the skin. This leaves the coat and skin partially washed, but never really squeaky clean.
  • Not enough concentration on the hard to get areas like behind the ears, under the arms, under the tail and the stomach and groin area, leaving an odor that prevents getting that squeaky clean look, smell and feel is another common mistake. When using a shampoo system, the shampoo is under pressure allowing you to squirt the shampoo in these hard to reach areas. When applying with a bottle, the shampoo just falls to the bottom of the tub and down the drain. If you are applying shampoo with a bottom squeeze some in your hands and apply to these hard to get areas.
  • Not cleaning the head area thoroughly, especially around the corners of the eyes, the underside of the ears, and the muzzle area, especially if the dog has long coat on the head is probably one of the most common mistakes. Pets with long coat on their heads especially with a mustache and beard, collect food and other debris in this hair. The long hair also serves as a catch all for eye drainage, ear discharge and various other things that the hair can pick up during their run in the backyard or on their way to the park. Focus on these areas and apply enough shampoo to thoroughly clean the coat.
  • Not allowing the shampoo or conditioners to stay on the coat long enough to do their job is a mistake made by bathers that are too focused on time management rather than quality. By applying the shampoo on the body first and then going to the head to shampoo, by the time you are ready to start the rinse on the body, the shampoo has had time to do it's job. This same concept applies to other coat products.
  • Not shampooing the coat as many times as it needs it to really get the skin and coat clean is still another common mistake made by bathers that are fighting the clock and trying to save time and shampoo. Dogs that are house dwellers and are bathed weekly are much easier to get clean than the yard lounger that comes to the salon every three or four months or once a year. Many times it just takes one good shampoo on dogs that are bathed weekly, however, to achieve a clean skin and coat on a dog that comes in once a year, you must shampoo the coat as many times as necessary to get that squeaky clean feel, look and smell. The first shampoo is just the beginning of getting a really dirty coat clean. You will notice that the first shampoo does not suds as much as the second or third due to the oil and dirt. In fact, the color of the suds tells you the whole story. If the suds still have a brownish or grayish cast, then you know that the dog is still dirty unless of course you are using color enhancing shampoos. Color enhancing shampoos, however, are normally not used to clean really dirty dogs, they are typically used after the coat is cleaned and then allowed to set on the coat to do their job.
  • Not rinsing all the shampoo out is a mistake made daily in most salons, which creates a dull, sticky type coat that can cause skin problems and cause the dog to scratch constantly after the bath. Shampoo left in the coat leaves a residue that looks like chalk. The more the coat is brushed, the more the chalky flakes appear, especially on dark colored dogs.
  • Over conditioning the coat making it dull and heavy to the touch and matting easily, creating more work for the pet family and the salon is also a common mistake made daily in salons. Not understanding what the product will do to the various coat types is one of the reasons for this mistake. Often times, the rule of thumb in a salon is that all dogs get a shampoo and a conditioner whether they need it or not. Be particular with the type of shampoo that you choose and make a decision based on condition of coat and coat type if you should condition the coat.

Safe & Gentle Handling

Protecting the Ears During the Bath
Use cotton balls in the ears to prevent water from entering into the ear canal on very active dogs, dogs with upright ears and dogs with ear infections or you may choose to use cotton balls in all ears just to be safe. Whatever policy that you establish in your salon, just remember to remove the cotton balls. Stories have been told about dogs going in for a grooming and months afterwards pet families finding old smelly cotton balls laying on the carpet or, even worse, veterinarians finding them in the ear.

Keep One Hand on the Dog at all Times During the Bath
Remember to keep one hand on the dog at all times during the bathing procedures and use the safety loop to secure the dog in the bathing station. If you have a "Dancing Dog" secure the pet with a second safety loop adjusted comfortably around the waist of the dog. Monitor the reaction of the pet at all times during the bathing procedure. Protect the dog's eyes by using a mild or tearless shampoo around the head.

Place the Dog in the Tub Away from the Drain
Most bathing tubs are four to five feet long allowing for plenty of space to work on the pet. To help prevent frightening the pet when turning the water on or to prevent hot water from touching the pet when the water is first turned on, secure the head of the pet away from the drain. Keeping the pet away from the drain creates a more relaxed environment for man's best friend because you are constantly turning the water on and off during the bathing procedure and this placement allows for most pets to stay out of the way when you are adjusting the water pressure and the temperature. Keeping the pet on the opposite end of the drain in the tub also keeps the dog from standing in suds from the shampoo when you are rinsing the coat.

Water Temperature For Bathing Dogs
The water temperature for bathing dogs should be just slightly on the warm side, never cold or hot. Even if a temperature control unit is utilized in the bathing station, check the water temperature by spraying water on the underside of your forearm prior to each application. Never test water temperature by using your hands as they are not as sensitive as the underside of your arm due to the daily exposure to heat, cold, etc.

Water Flow
Always point the hose toward the drain when turning the water on. When working on the head area, always direct the water flow away from the eyes, ears, nose and mouth, and keep the water pressure down to prevent frightening the pet and to prevent spraying directly into the eyes, ears, nose and mouth. Always hold the nozzle close to the dog’s body to also prevent frightening the pet; if held away, the spray can terrify even the water loving Labrador Retriever. If held close, the pressure of the water not only helps clean the coat and skin better, but it can actually act as a massage and the dog will enjoy it rather than attempt to flee and take flight out of the tub.

Pets with Special Needs

Bathing a Breathing Challenged Pet
Bathing breathing challenged pets takes special care to prevent spraying water in the nose because of the structure of the head. In addition, most breeds that are breathing challenged also have large eyes, which means additional caution must be taken when bathing dogs with pushed in faces and large eyes, to avoid injuring or even causing these eyes to come out of the socket (prolapse).

Heads Up/Heads Level/Heads Down
The positioning of the head plays an important role when bathing breathing challenged pets, however, the most important step is to make sure that the nose is protected to prevent water from spraying or draining into the nose. If you hold the head down, the water can drain down the foreface and over the nose. The dog can pull water into the nose with each breath, causing a very dangerous situation for the pet. For small pets, as little as a few teaspoons of water can cause a serve reaction by preventing breathing, and may possibly cause death. Holding the head upward creates a situation where it is very easy to spray water into the nose. Holding the head upward is also uncomfortable for the pet and can cause additional stress and if you hold the head level you are still dealing with the same problem...water in the nose.

To prevent the water from entering the nose create a shield with your hand to protect the nose, eyes and mouth area. Hold your four fingers together and spread your hand creating an open "c." Place your hand over the eyes on the brow area creating a visor to divert the water. Keep the direction of the water flow going backwards. A cloth can be used to wash and rinse in areas around the eyes and nose area where it is not safe to run the water. Keep the water pressure turned down and when using a cloth, take extra care to make sure that all shampoo is removed.

Salon First Aid

Blinking Eyes
Blinking eyes during or right after the bath is not a good sign for the professional because it typically means that shampoo or another product that you used during the bathing process is in the dog's eyes. You must react immediately to this situation by rinsing the eyes thoroughly. Gently secure the head and rinse the eyes using large amounts of sterile eyewash or tap water. A good policy to follow in the salon with a dog that is blinking is if you think that you have rinsed the eyes enough then you should probably continue to rinse them some more. Keep the water turned on low so that you do not irritate the eye more by using too much water pressure. If the dog continues to blink and is showing no signs of relief, finish the bathing and drying process and seek medical attention immediately to help prevent serious injury to the eyes.

Professional Image
The bathing procedures incorporate soothing massage techniques that creates a professional image like no other in a dog grooming and styling salon. The bathing procedures require that the dog receive an overall body massage during the bathing process in order to get the coat and skin clean. The pet normally responds to these techniques by relaxing and enjoying this phase of the grooming. This professional image can change drastically when the pet is removed from the tub and all the shedding coat is stuck all over and the professional walks out of the room leaving the bathing station in this disarray.

Safety Policy

  • Wear nonskid shoes.
  • Wear safety glasses at all times in the bathing room. Pets shake from their heads to their tails. Products fly. Wear your safety glasses!
  • Wear ear plugs at all times in the bathing room when using a high velocity dryer or if others are using dryers.

Sanitation
To keep the bathing station organized and sanitized during the bathing procedure is a challenge for the professional because the objective during the bath is to not only clean the skin and coat but to also assist in deshedding the coat making for a real messy procedure on many coat types, especially the dogs that have determined hair growth and that shed in a block or band fashion. The best policy to follow to maintain an overall sanitary environment during the bathing session with dogs with these coat types is to rinse the tub after rinsing the dog. Final clean up of the overall bathing station should be left until the bathing procedure is complete.

Time Management
To create excellent time management during the bathing phase is to utilize shampoo systems or use a nozzle that creates enough water pressure so that you can penetrate the coat. Shampoo systems that apply water and shampoo at the same time can help you to create better time management, however, they can also slow you down if the shampoo is not mixed strong enough to do its job.

Client Relations: Notification to the Pet Family

  • Notify the pet owner of any signs of parasites such as fleas and ticks.
  • Notify the pet owner of any signs of skin infections, sores, etc.

Client Relations: Recommendation to the Pet Family
Schedule a more frequent bathing schedule to keep the skin and coat healthier if needed on specific coat types and the lifestyle of the pet.

Client Relations: Pet Family Education
Using high quality shampoos and conditioners appropriate for your dog's skin and coat type prevents the coat from matting and helps prevent and control skin problems and allows the pet to be bathed on a more frequent schedule. Your pet can stay clean and fresh smelling at all times. Discuss the best grooming schedule for your pet with your professional groomer.

Pet Grooming Training